Labor history dissertation prize

Many children worked 16 hour days under atrocious conditions, as their elders did. Ineffective parliamentary acts to regulate the work of workhouse children in factories and cotton mills to 12 hours per day had been passed as early as 1802 and 1819. After radical agitation, notably in 1831, when "Short Time Committees" organized largely by Evangelicals began to demand a ten hour day, a royal commission established by the Whig government recommended in 1833 that children aged 11-18 be permitted to work a maximum of twelve hours per day; children 9-11 were allowed to work 8 hour days; and children under 9 were no longer permitted to work at all (children as young as 3 had been put to work previously). This act applied only to the textile industry, where children were put to work at the age of 5, and not to a host of other industries and occupations . Iron and coal mines (where children, again, both boys and girls , began work at age 5, and generally died before they were 25), gas works, shipyards, construction, match factories, nail factories, and the business of chimney sweeping, for example (which Blake would use as an emblem of the destruction of the innocent), where the exploitation of child labor was more extensive, was to be enforced in all of England by a total of four inspectors. After further radical agitation, another act in 1847 limited both adults and children to ten hours of work daily.

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Trade unions were finally legalized in 1872, after a Royal Commission on Trade Unions in 1867 agreed that the establishment of the organizations was to the advantage of both employers and employees.

British artist Walter Crane's " Labor's May Day," with its depiction of the worker as male, but united across nations and color lines, and inspired by ...

“Freedom is never given it is won.”             A Philip Randolph, 1889-1979

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labor history dissertation prize

Labor history dissertation prize

British artist Walter Crane's " Labor's May Day," with its depiction of the worker as male, but united across nations and color lines, and inspired by ...

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labor history dissertation prize

Labor history dissertation prize

Action Action

labor history dissertation prize

Labor history dissertation prize

Trade unions were finally legalized in 1872, after a Royal Commission on Trade Unions in 1867 agreed that the establishment of the organizations was to the advantage of both employers and employees.

Action Action

labor history dissertation prize
Labor history dissertation prize

British artist Walter Crane's " Labor's May Day," with its depiction of the worker as male, but united across nations and color lines, and inspired by ...

Action Action

Labor history dissertation prize

Action Action

labor history dissertation prize

Labor history dissertation prize

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labor history dissertation prize

Labor history dissertation prize

Trade unions were finally legalized in 1872, after a Royal Commission on Trade Unions in 1867 agreed that the establishment of the organizations was to the advantage of both employers and employees.

Action Action

labor history dissertation prize

Labor history dissertation prize

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Labor history dissertation prize

“Freedom is never given it is won.”             A Philip Randolph, 1889-1979

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Labor history dissertation prize

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